The mid-term elections are fast approaching, and we are all praying for victory across the
political board. Some of us are dreaming about more gubernatorial miracles like Virginia
Governor Glenn Youngkin’s defeat of Ralph Northam. Marylanders are hoping beyond hope that
Republican momentum will hold and that Governor Hogan will pass the baton to Dan Cox.
Many are wondering whether Ron DeSantis will run for president in 2024. One might argue,
though, that the races to watch – and in which to participate most – are the battles for the U.S.
Senate.

Republican governors have their role to play in the fight for the soul of the United States. From
their offices, they can keep pockets of American territory free from the federal government’s
efforts to dominate citizens’ lives. States like Florida and Texas have become oases in the midst
of the desolation that is America under Democrat presidents such as Barack Obama and Joe
Biden. Brave conservatives such as Rep. Dan Crenshaw, Jim Jordan, and Matt Gaetz have been
doing what they can to throw a wrench in the Democrat-dominated House of Representatives.
But of utmost consequence is the United States Senate. It must be won. Here’s why.

Senators have the power to hold the cultural line of our country. If you review a senator’s job
description, you will find the responsibility of confirming presidential nominees to the U.S.
Court of Appeals, the various district courts, and, most delicate of all, the United States Supreme
Court. The judges who sit at these benches hold our culture and our values in their hands. Their
decisions determine whether America will be a country that fights against crime or allows it to
thrive. They have the power to safeguard a citizen’s right to privacy, his religious freedom, and
his right to defend any particular cause he wishes to support. These judges, as we have seen
recently, can decide whether America will cherish life at the moment of its conception or destroy
it with the most wanton selfishness. During President Obama’s term, we witnessed the Senate’s
power when it refused to hold confirmation hearings for Merrick Garland. Given his
performance as our attorney general, I doubt any of us regret the Senate’s decision. And would
any of us thank our current Senate for confirming a woman to the Supreme Court who refuses to
define what a woman is on purely ideological grounds? I think not.

This is why it is imperative that we win enough seats to gain the United States Senate. I am
willing to say that our American way of life depends on it. With so much at stake, we cannot
afford to sit at home on mid-term election day.

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